Carter and Racing to take legal action

Date published: November 1 2016

LEICESTER, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 23:  Dan Carter of Racing 92 looks on during the European Rugby Champions Cup match between Leicester Tigers and Racing 92 at Welford Road on October 23, 2016 in Leicester, United Kingdom. (Photo by Dan Mullan/Getty Images)

Former All Blacks Dan Carter and Joe Rokocoko have decided to make a case to the French public prosecutor after they were accused of doping and their medical records were released by the media.

Carter, Rokocoko and Argentina wing Juan Imhoff were the target of an investigation by the medical commission of the French Rugby Federation after testing positive for corticosteroids following last season’s Top 14 final.

The trio were cleared of any wrongdoing, along with Racing’s medical staff, but the incident has now prompoted the club to take the matter further.

AFP reports Racing feels the media “distorted the public’s perception of the players” and has vowed to take action to “shine the light” on how their confidentiality was breached.

“After totally justified medical treatment dispensed conforming to the rules, three Racing players saw their medical confidentiality breached when details were reported by the media,” Racing said in a statement.

“This serious and evident violation must not create any future difficulty for anyone wishing to work securely and transparently with the relevant anti-doping institutions.”

French sports daily L’Equipe originally revealed the positive tests on October 7. French television channel Canal claimed Carter’s corticosteroid readings showed 81 nanogrammes per millilitre, with 49 for Rokocoko and 31 for Imhoff, while the World Anti-Doping Agency has set a limit of 30.

Corticosteroids can be used to combat pain, inflammation or allergies.

They can be injected into joints or inhaled but it is illegal to take them orally or have them injected in either the blood or muscle. Although, athletes can use them in such a way by applying for the controversial Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).

Racing said they did not require TUE and were adamant they followed the correct medical procedures.

The club was ultimately vindicated two weeks ago following a probe by the French Rugby Federation.

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